Final Fantasy VII Remake: Combat Tips

Final Fantasy VII Remake: Combat Tips

Square Enix outdid themselves with their remake of FFVII, albeit more of a reimagining than a straight up recreation. The combat system is a major part of the game that has also been reimagined. If you’re unfamiliar with Square’s more recent FF entries, this real-time action combat system might be a bit difficult to come to grips with. Don’t worry. I’m here to help.

Upgrade Your Weapons Thoughtfully

The weapon upgrading system in this game is basically how you can give assign a character with a particular class or job in combat.

The flexibility of this system is fantastic if you use it wisely. For example, if you want Barret to be your tank, dump his SP into Physical Defense and Magic Defense before anything else. Then dump the leftover to buff his attack, or MP so he can use Barrier or Manaward to make himself even tankier.

Note that no weapons in this game seem to be any better or worse than others. When a character earns SP, all of their weapons will gain the same amount, regardless of what weapon is equipped. This makes any weapon a viable option throughout the entire game. Though, some weapons will naturally be better for certain roles in the party.

And don’t worry about if you don’t like how a weapon came out. You can always visit Chadley to reset the weapon, getting all your hard-earned SP refunded.

Materia, Materia, Materia

The materia system of the original FFVII is one of the few parts of the new combat system that has remained relatively unchanged. If you slot a character’s weapon or armor with a Fire materia, that character will be able to use the Fire spell, and if they continue to use that materia, they will level it up, and eventually gain access to Fira and Firaga.

This is another system you have to approach thoughtfully. If the character you’re focusing on is playing the role of a black mage, equip them with the elemental materia, and equip another character with materia that will enhance their physical attack prowess (like Steadfast Block and Deadly Dodge), or materia that they can use to support your other party members (like Barrier and Item Master).

There are a huge amount of options to play with here, and some combinations will be more effective in certain battles. Be sure to re-slot materia frequently, to find arrangements that compliment your play style.

And don’t forget about Chadley’s Battle Intel Quests. Completing these can net you some of the most useful materia in the game.

Blocking

Blocking is extremely useful in this game. It is important to block incoming attacks.

Before an enemy uses a particularly dangerous attack, the name of that spell or ability will appear a

Don’t Forget to Switch Party Members

Now that we have a role for each team member, and finally got out of all those menu screens, we can get to the combat.

In the beginning of the game, I was doing fine with the combat. I had one character to control, and a couple bad guys to cut up with my Buster Sword. Easy.

But as I progressed in the game, I quickly got control of other party members, and I found myself having to battle multiple enemies, while I was controlling multiple characters.It was overwhelming to me at first, because I was still controlling Cloud nearly all the time, and hoping that my other party members would do their part. They didn’t.

If you upgrade your weapons and slot your materia thoughtfully, each character will have an easier time dealing with certain enemy types. For example, if you’re battling against a bunch of robots, using Cloud and mashing the attack button won’t get you too far. Instead, try switching to your mage and blasting that enemy with some Thunder. Once their staggered, switch back to Cloud, go into Punisher Mode and go to town.

Fill Those ATB Gauges

The ATB gauge is another system that returns from the original FFVII. You have to wait for this gauge to fill up before you can use any abilities, spells, items or summons.

Knowing how to fill your ATB gauges quickly, can be the difference between success and failure in this game.

The flexibility of the weapon and materia systems gives you a lot of different ways to do this.

One option I find useful is to equip your support character with a First Strike materia as well as a Time materia. First Strike will give that character an increase in their ATB gauge at the start of battle. I then use that initial ATB bar to cast Haste on another party member, drastically increasing their ATB fill rate. If that character’s weapon is upgraded with Buff Duration boosts, that’ll just make their ATB fill up faster for longer.

Switching control to a particular party member will aslo raise their ATB gauge far more quickly than a non-player-controlled character. This can be useful if you want to have a certain ability or spell ready for when the enemy is staggered or under pressure.

Access Materia/ Pressuring and Staggering

Another important part of combat is staggering enemies. This will put the enemy into an extremely vulnerable state, allowing your party to deal massive damage.

It’s important to have one of your party member equipped with Access materia. This can be used to scan enemies, revealing a lot of useful information like the enemy’s weaknesses, resistances, as well as an explanation of how to put them under pressure and eventually stagger them.

Once your enemy is staggered, your party will deal 160% damage. This is only the starting point and can be increased upon. When the enemy is staggered, if you switch to Tifa, she can increase the damage percentage by using Whirling Uppercut, Omnistrike, and Rise and Fall. To do this most effectively, use her Unbridled Strength ability a couple times to max out her chi before staggering the enemy.

Tifa’s weapon ability, True Strike, as well as Aerith’s Ray of Judgment are also valid options to raise the damage percentage of staggered enemies.

The box art for Borderlands 3 has dropped and it looks awesome!

The box art for Borderlands 3 has dropped and it looks awesome!

Ok, so, by know you basically know we’re total fanboys and girls of this game, but sincerely, doesn’t this box art blow away anything you’ve seen so far this year?

Borderlands 3 Box Art Official 2019

Always been a big fan of the style and art of the game. That is one of the reasons i got into it all those years ago when the original Borderlands game came out. The fact that i was able to play with friends through a split screen grinding experience was also top knotch and not something many other games were doing back then.

faces in the roses of the box art

Do you see all of the little faces in the roses? Pretty cool!

Can’t wait to get our hands on this one. God willing, we will be able to get an early copy! SPG is on its way up the ladder! We’re coming for you IGN!

Until next time,

Keep it locked in here to Sweatpants Gaming.

Peace!

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Review – Our first impressions

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Review – Our first impressions

We’ve been able to get our hands on Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice for PS4… and so has everyone else. We don’t get advance copies of games for PS4 yet ;(

But anyway, the game is pretty amazing on all levels that I (Tom) can tell. Let’s break it down with a few categories:

Art

First things first, the art of Sekiro.

The game takes place in a feudal japan-looking, snowy, mountainous landscape. The buildings are very typical to those you would find in feudal Japan. The ridged rooftops you’ve seen 100 times in games that take place in this time period – one of my personal favorite historical eras.

The graphics go for a very realistic, somewhat gritty feel and i think they nail it right on the head. It looks good.

The graphics style kind of reminds me of Metal Gear if you wanted to compare it to something aside from Dark Souls. It’s kind of hard to describe. It’s stiff and rigid, but in a good way that helps it feel more realistic.

Overall gameplay

If you love getting fuckin absolutely destroyed over and over like the sick sadistic person you are then this game will butter your biscuit for sure.

You will fight your way to each checkpoint and when you finally get to it there is no feeling quite as good.

The punishing combat and stiff difficulty really make each fight feel like it holds weight. I really enjoy that kind of thing in my games so that works for me. If you’re more into the easygoing narrative type of game or like the idea of participation trophies, this game probably isn’t your speed.

Combat System

If you’ve ever played dark souls or any other game by this developer, you pretty much know the deal. Honestly, you can identify this combat system in a way more games than that. Seems every adventure game has pretty much been biting this the style of Japanese and super gangster developers From Software

Wielding the razor-sharp katana of a badass shinobi has never felt quite so good. Dodge, roll, jump and slash your way across feudal Japan fighting everything from samurai to some pretty friggin scary monsters if I do say so myself.

The last good ninja game we had was that game from like 10 years ago called “ninja” or something like that. Way too lazy to look that up right now but you know what I’m talking about…. That game was fire.

The fighting is ruthlessly punishing, as you’d expect from a game made by the guys who brought you dark souls.

Movement

One way that Sekiro is better than Dark Souls lies in the movement system. It’s never felt quite so good to jump in one of these kinds of games. You have control of your character in the air and can use aerial attacks and grapple to high places. The stealth of the game is one of the most viable ways to play, which is pretty awesome if you’re into stealth kills and sneaking around.

Stealth

The stealth gameplay in Sekiro makes for a pretty awesome change of pace when comparing to dark souls. You can move through bushes while crouched to remain undetected like a real shinobi would do it. You can also pull off some crazy looking kills on the people you pounce on, stabbing your katana through their throat or skull and watching the blood shoot out. Extremely satisfying.

The blood gets on you too and splatters on walls, etc. Im a big fan of violent games and movies, so this really did it for me.

More to come

If you’re into Sekiro and want to see more, lock in to Sweatpants Gaming and wait patiently for us to drop some new stuff. It’s always on the way.

We’ve been making tons of improvements to our platform in preparation for that sweet sweet viral piece of content we have coming pretty much any way now.

Stay rocking those sweats my guys.

[SPG] Tom

The only Red Dead Redemption 2 Review that matters

The only Red Dead Redemption 2 Review that matters

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

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Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

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Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Cryptic Fallout Message

Cryptic Fallout Message

We’re not sure to make of it, but Bethesda and the Fallout crew just put out a teaser of sorts. Being big fans of the Fallout series, we are excited, to say the least. In the gaming community, there have certainly been mixed reactions about Fallout 4, but that won’t stop us from wanting to get our hands on the latest Fallout content.

So What Is It?

Well, we wish we had more to go off of than a 3-second video which you could watch here, but the likely thoughts are Fallout 5? New Fallout 4 DLC? Or even a remastered 3 or New Vegas. Honestly, I’d be excited for just about all of these possible outcomes. So let’s speculate for a minute.

Fallout 5?

They did so much right with 4, but there were some drawbacks that the gaming community has not let up on which drags the opinion of the game down a bit. If they take the dynamic storytelling, base building, power suits, and character customization from 4 and build on those aspects I think they’ll have another monster hit on their hands. So here’s to hoping to another fine installment of a great series.

Remastered?

I hate to admit, but I never got the chance to sink my teeth into 3 and I would love to in a non-dated format. If it’s New Vegas remastered that would be dope as well. New Vegas is a masterpiece of a game and its storytelling can be hard to top in the video game industry. There’s always a reason to go back and play New Vegas. If you’re someone who’s reading this and hasn’t played it go! Go now and play it.

Fallout 4 DLC?

No. I really hope that’s not it. That would be disappointing, to say the least.

Let Us Know Your Theories Below