Microsoft Acquires Bethesda for $7.5b | What it means for us as gamers

Microsoft Acquires Bethesda for $7.5b | What it means for us as gamers

BREAKING NEWS!!

Microsoft has just acquired Bethesda Studios for 7.5 billion dollars

What does this mean are PlayStation Gamers? Probably that they won’t be able to play the newest installment of Elder Scrolls, Elder Scrolls 6. But for those who were planning on playing the new Elder Scrolls game on their PC, it will probably have very little effect.

If you have been playing PC and you have the Xbox app downloaded, you’ll probably have realized by now that you can do many of the things you can do with an Xbox right on your PC. For PC players this is great. The new Halo game will most likely be following suit of Gears of War and be dropping on PC at the same time that it drops on the Xbox. We can now probably expect the same thing for Elder Scroll 6. It will be on PC maybe even streaming from Xbox with no download required when it comes out. However, we do not have confirmation of that that it’s just speculation.

We will be continuing to follow this story as it develops and what it means for gamers on Playstation as well as Switch, PC, and Xbox. Please keep it locked to Sweatpants Gaming. Talk to you soon.

The only Red Dead Redemption 2 Review that matters

The only Red Dead Redemption 2 Review that matters

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

[/et_pb_text] [/et_pb_column] [/et_pb_row] [/et_pb_section]

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

Yes, we mean ours.


Red Dead Redemption 2, like its predecessor, puts you in the middle of an enthralling quest shortly after the Wild West era. However, this prequel is a much more captivating and exponentially longer quest than its aforementioned predecessor.

RDR2 lets you take control of Arthur Morgan, a long-established Outlaw of the Van der Linde gang. The gang is amidst a long-lasting run from the law due to a robbery that went awry.

“They’re chasing us hard, because we represent everything they fear.”

Dutch Van der Linde

In the earlier stages of the game, Arthur Morgan feels slightly dull, on a linear yet stunning series of opening missions that take place in the midst of a  harsh snow storm. Although Arthur seemed to be an uninspired protagonist from the start, his charm slowly but surely began to grow on me.

There is a great deal to do in this game. Even after my 50+ hour main campaign play through, there are still towns that I’m yet to show face in and gangs that I’m yet to face-off with.

“We’re theives in a world that don’t want us no more”

Arthur Morgan

The world design is second to none. Every single place you go has a unique and intricate attention to detail that makes the world feel alive in a way that I’ve never before seen in gaming. Whether it’s admiring (or hunting) the sprawling wildlife in unestablished areas of the map, or just taking a stroll through your camp, ensuring that your fellow outlaws are keeping their heads through tough times, every bit of the map makes you feel like you’re actually living in it.

Even more than the main story missions, the world itself is what began to reveal Arthur’s more likable qualities for me. When slowly pacing through camp, you can choose to greet or antagonize your allies, and the way they react to Arthur is what gives the game a unique character- building technique. The game builds characters more through their relationships and interactions with their peers more than it does on their own individual merits. This only further builds the “gang mentality” that makes the game feel so real.

The random encounters and stranger quests also contribute to the world building. Although certain encounters have the same premise as others, the voice lines are so varied that you rarely feel that you’ve had this happen to you before.

This voice line variation extends to other parts of the game as well. For example, in one mission, an ally of mine was captured and taken prisoner. I then started another mission that was available both before and after my ally got captured, and Arthur and his comrade spoke about the capture on their horse ride. Things like this happen fairly frequently, and it leads to a sense of immersion that hopefully sets a new standard in gaming.

“Running scams, robbing banks, screwing over the rich and horrible” 

Karen Jones

The missions in RDR2 range drastically. There are some missions where you’re pulling off the heist of the century, and getting in shootouts that would make Django blush, and there are others that you’re simply harvesting medicinal plants for the sick, enjoying the beauty and brutality of the world.

That being said, some of the shoot-first and ask questions last missions can begin to feel repetitive and drawn-out, particularly in Acts 5 and 6.

“The amount of hell we’ve raised, we’re owed some back”

Charles Smith

Overall, Rockstar Game Studios once again outdid themselves with this title. The superb story-telling and outstanding attention to detail really blew me away. The game left an impression on me that no game has left before.

Even after the conclusion of such a lengthy campaign, I find myself wanting to dive back in as long as there are animals left to hunt, fish left to catch, and people left to rob.

I’d give the game a 10/10. Although a game can never be absolutely flawless, I think Redemption 2 is as close as it gets.

David Bautista is Pursuing a Spot in the Gears of War Movie. As guess who?

David Bautista is Pursuing a Spot in the Gears of War Movie. As guess who?

Dave Bautista has set out to pursue not just a role in the new Gears of War movie, but the most pivotal role in the new Gears of War movie: Marcus Fenix himself. Is the age of crappy video game movies finally over? Can we look to expect performances like this from major stars in days to come? Only time will tell but we really like where this is going.

The ‘Avengers’ star (Draxx) is teaming up with the likes of Epic Games and The Coalition to bring our beloved Gears of War to the big screen and we couldn’t be happier. At least Epic is spending some of that Fortnite money on something for us, right? Gears of War was a hit from the time it first dropped on Xbox back in 2006. Since then, they have had 4 installments. They have all been great games and the crew here has played them thoroughly, to say the least.

The community has spoken, we want this movie to hit theaters, like, yesterday…

As things continue to progress on this story, we will be sure to keep you updated with the latest! Cheers to the end of the video game cinematic curse. Let’s hope this is the start of something amazing!

Cryptic Fallout Message

Cryptic Fallout Message

We’re not sure to make of it, but Bethesda and the Fallout crew just put out a teaser of sorts. Being big fans of the Fallout series, we are excited, to say the least. In the gaming community, there have certainly been mixed reactions about Fallout 4, but that won’t stop us from wanting to get our hands on the latest Fallout content.

So What Is It?

Well, we wish we had more to go off of than a 3-second video which you could watch here, but the likely thoughts are Fallout 5? New Fallout 4 DLC? Or even a remastered 3 or New Vegas. Honestly, I’d be excited for just about all of these possible outcomes. So let’s speculate for a minute.

Fallout 5?

They did so much right with 4, but there were some drawbacks that the gaming community has not let up on which drags the opinion of the game down a bit. If they take the dynamic storytelling, base building, power suits, and character customization from 4 and build on those aspects I think they’ll have another monster hit on their hands. So here’s to hoping to another fine installment of a great series.

Remastered?

I hate to admit, but I never got the chance to sink my teeth into 3 and I would love to in a non-dated format. If it’s New Vegas remastered that would be dope as well. New Vegas is a masterpiece of a game and its storytelling can be hard to top in the video game industry. There’s always a reason to go back and play New Vegas. If you’re someone who’s reading this and hasn’t played it go! Go now and play it.

Fallout 4 DLC?

No. I really hope that’s not it. That would be disappointing, to say the least.

Let Us Know Your Theories Below

Paying Our Respects To a Classic

Paying Our Respects To a Classic

Fortnite has quickly taken over the video game world for all ages. The player customization, diversity of game modes, replay system, and the simple yet addictive battle royale concept are genius innovations that other games haven’t completely tapped into. Or have they.

Where It All Started

As an athlete and sports games were always an easy draw for me. A competitive, trash talk filled NBA 2K, Madden, or FIFA game was all I needed, but in 2007 the release of Halo 3 changed everything. Side Note: It still has the best theme music ever. Don’t believe me? Just check out this beautiful viral rendition of it and tell me you didn’t get goosebumps. Now back to the post, FPS quickly took over my gaming world along with everyone else. With arguably one of the greatest storylines in gaming, everything from the campaign, to Xbox live play was entertaining. One of Halo’s first innovations was combining the two. Halo 2 was one of the first non-PC games that you can play the campaign with friends online. Along with an assortment of online game modes.

Now when I look at the all popular Fornite I can’t help but notice that a lot of the aspects that make the game extremely popular and fun were done by the Halo franchise, and to be honest, I think Bungie and Halo did it better. Let’s start with the customization aspect. Fortnite allows you to purchase or unlock multiple skins, pickaxes, backpacks, etc. without giving a tactical advantage to the game. I’m sure you’ve heard or read the following – “These items are cosmetic only and grant no competitive advantage.” The statement alone has become a meme. Halo 3 allowed customization of your Spartan Soldier or Covenant Elite, with different armors, helmets, etc. also without giving a tactical advantage in the game. Although you could always tell the good players from the bad based on their soldier. I was running from a flaming Hayabusa armor wearing Spartan soldier just as fast as I’m running from a John Wick/Omega.

Another aspect of Fortnite is its limited time game modes. Boredom is not an option when they give you an opportunity to try new styles of play such as all legendary guns, 50v50, or even the sponsored infinity gauntlet Thanos game mode. Halo was far ahead of its time with an identical aspect of limited time games modes such as the all popular SWAT, shotty/snipes, rocket race, etc. It was a genius idea to not only create diversity in the game but to test new game modes to see popularity and possibly make improvements down the road.

Halo 3When it comes to professional gaming or streamers a game replay mode is imperative to their work. One of Fortnite’s biggest updated added a replay system that you can see full gameplay from different angles and multiple perspectives. This, being a great addition, hs come with many flaws and bugs that are supposedly getting fixed. Nonetheless, it is a great feature, but let us not forget the Halo theater mode. It was a steamers wet dream. Halo 3 and its theater mode was such an innovation as it sparked a youtube channel Machinima dedicated to making productions like shows and mini-movies from Halo 3 gameplay. if anything Halo 3’s replay mode was the one aspect that was far before its time.

All in all, I’m not trying to take away from Fortnite’s success, however, what I am doing is attempting to put things into perspective for an internet that seemingly has a very short memory. While yes, Fortnite is doing a ton of things right they’re not the originators of many of their ideas. It doesn’t make them bad, or biters or anything like that let’s just put some respect on Halo’s name. Love live Master Chief, and no not that friggin’ imposter that 343 claims to still be Master Chief.

As always, leave your comments below! And Be sure to check out the rest of our post here.